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The Cavapoo is a mixed breed dog — a cross between the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel and Poodle dog breeds. Outgoing, playful, and curious, these pups inherit some of the best traits from both of their parents.

Cavapoos go by several names, including Cavadoodle and Cavoodle. Despite their unfortunate status as a designer breed, you can find these mixed breed dogs in shelters and rescues, so remember to adopt!

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History

Golden Retrievers shed profusely, especially in the spring and fall. Daily brushing will get some of the loose hair out of the coat, keeping it from settling on your clothing and all over your house. But if you live with a Golden, you’ll have to get used to dog hair.
Golden Retrievers are family dogs; they need to live indoors with their human “pack,” and shouldn’t spend hours alone in the backyard.
Golden Retrievers are active dogs who need 40-60 minutes of hard exercise daily. They thrive on obedience training, agility classes, and other canine activities, which are a great way to give your dog physical and mental exercise.

The Cavapoo dog breed may have existed naturally over the years, but designer breeders in Australia started intentionally mixing Cavalier King Charles Spaniels and Poodles in the late 1990s.

Breeders wanted to mix the outgoing and calmer nature of the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel with the intelligence of a Poodle. Since Poodles tend to shed less, they were also selected in an effort to create a mixed breed for allergy sufferers. Breeders continued to create Cavapoos as demand for the mixed-breed pups climbed.

The Labrador Retriever is the traditional waterdog of Newfoundland, long employed as a duck retriever and fisherman’s mate. The breed began its steady climb to supreme popularity in the early 1800s, when Labs were spotted by English nobles visiting Canada. These sporting earls and lords returned to England with fine specimens of “Labrador dogs.” (Exactly how these dogs of Newfoundland became associated with Labrador is unclear, but the name stuck.) During the latter half of the 19th century, British breeders refined and standardized the breed.

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